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Terbinafine - Vitiligo

This page contains links to eMedTV Skin Articles containing information on subjects from Terbinafine to Vitiligo. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Terbinafine
    Terbinafine is commonly prescribed to treat both fingernail and toenail fungus. This segment of the eMedTV library explains how the drug works and offers an in-depth look at its uses, effects, dosage information, and possible side effects.
  • Terbinafine Dosing
    This eMedTV Web page offers terbinafine dosing guidelines for the treatment of fingernail fungus, toenail fungus, and ringworm of the scalp. It also notes that it can take a few months after treatment ends before the full effects of the drug are seen.
  • Terbinafine HCl
    Terbinafine hydrochloride (HCl) is often used to treat fingernail and toenail fungus. This portion of the eMedTV library takes a closer look at this medication, with information on what else it is prescribed for and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Topical Calcitriol
    A doctor may prescribe calcitriol ointment to treat plaque psoriasis in adults. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at this topical medicine, including how to use calcitriol ointment and possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Topical Fluticasone Propionate
    Topical fluticasone propionate is a type of steroid prescribed to treat certain skin problems. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at how this skin medicine works, outlines some general dosing guidelines, and lists possible side effects.
  • Topical Fluticasone Propionate Dosage
    Apply a small amount of topical fluticasone propionate to the affected area of the skin once or twice daily. This eMedTV article describes more specific guidelines when using this medicine to treat dermatitis, eczema, and various other skin conditions.
  • Topical Fluticasone Propionate Information
    Topical fluticasone propionate is a drug that is prescribed to treat a wide variety of skin problems. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on topical fluticasone propionate, including potential side effects and general safety precautions.
  • Topical Fluticasone Propionate Side Effects
    Redness, dryness, and other skin reactions are possible side effects of topical fluticasone propionate. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at other potential problems, including serious and long-term complications that may require medical care.
  • Transmission of Body Lice
    Transmission of body lice can occur through sharing clothes and towels with an infested person. This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses other ways of transmitting body lice and also describes how body lice can sometimes spread other diseases.
  • Treat Alopecia Areata
    This eMedTV article explains that you can treat alopecia areata with various drugs, including corticosteroids, minoxidil, and anthralin. This article describes the various forms of treatment and points out that the results may not be permanent.
  • Treatment for a Simple Staph Infection
    Treating a mild staph infection may be as simple as applying warm compresses to the affected skin. This eMedTV article talks about simple staph infections and how they are treated. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis in Infants and Children
    Tips regarding treatment for atopic dermatitis in infants and children provided in this eMedTV article include giving lukewarm baths, using skin lubricants, and selecting soft cotton clothing.
  • Treatment for Body Lice
    As explained in this eMedTV article, treatment for body lice generally involves laundering or throwing away the infested person's clothing. This page also explains how medications are sometimes used for getting rid of body lice.
  • Treatment for Contact Dermatitis
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, contact dermatitis treatment can include avoiding the cause of the inflammation, taking medications, and using lotions or other treatments. This page takes a look at several treatment options for this condition.
  • Treatment for Lichen Sclerosus
    As this eMedTV page explains, the lichen sclerosus treatment that is right for you depends on the area affected, the severity, and whether symptoms are present. This article describes the different treatment options for men, women, and children.
  • Treatment of Alopecia Areata
    As this eMedTV segment explains, alopecia areata treatment can involve topical medications, photochemotherapy, and oral drugs. These treatments may lead to hair growth, but they will not prevent future hair loss or cure the underlying disease.
  • Triamcinalone
    This eMedTV page explains triamcinolone is used to treat several conditions, such as allergies, arthritis, asthma, and certain skin conditions. This page also lists some potential side effects. Triamcinalone is a common misspelling of triamcinolone.
  • Triamcinilone Acetonide Cream
    Triamcinolone acetonide cream is prescribed to treat eczema, dermatitis, or other skin problems. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and lists side effects. Triamcinilone acetonide cream is a common misspelling of triamcinolone acetonide cream.
  • Triamcinolone
    Triamcinolone is a medication that can treat several conditions, such as asthma and allergies. This eMedTV article provides an overview of triamcinolone, describing the various forms of the medicine, its uses, dosing information, and side effects.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream
    Triamcinolone acetonide cream is prescribed to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV resource explains how this steroid works to treat skin inflammation, lists potential side effects, and describes when and how to apply it.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream 0.1%
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who have eczema, psoriasis, or certain other skin problems may benefit from triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% cream. This page lists the other available strengths of this medicine and provides a link to more details.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV resource discusses whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use triamcinolone acetonide cream (Kenalog cream). This article explains whether this drug passes through breast milk and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for a pregnant woman to use triamcinolone acetonide cream (Kenalog cream). This eMedTV resource discusses the results of animal studies done on this drug, and explains why the FDA has classified it as a Category C medication.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the initial triamcinolone acetonide cream dosage is usually a thin layer applied to the affected areas two to four times daily. This page further explores the dosing guidelines for this drug.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream Information
    If you have eczema or other skin problems, you may benefit from triamcinolone acetonide cream. This eMedTV page provides some basic information on triamcinolone acetonide cream, such as safety concerns, dosing guidelines, and possible side effects.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream Overdose
    As this eMedTV article explains, your body may stop producing its own natural steroids if you use too much triamcinolone acetonide cream (Kenalog cream) for a long period of time. This page covers other possible overdose symptoms and treatment options.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, side effects of triamcinolone acetonide cream may include stretch marks or a burning sensation. This article lists other reactions, including possible long-term reactions and serious problems that require medical care.
  • Triamsinolone Cream
    As this eMedTV page explains, triamcinolone acetonide cream is prescribed to treat certain skin conditions. This page covers how it works and lists possible side effects. Triamsinolone cream is a common misspelling of triamcinolone acetonide cream.
  • Types of Cellulitis
    The most common type of cellulitis is cellulitis of the extremities. As discussed in this eMedTV segment, other types of cellulitis include orbital, periorbital, facial, perianal, and breast cellulitis. This article defines these forms of cellulitis.
  • Ultravat
    Ultravate is a medicated cream and ointment prescribed to treat eczema, psoriasis, or other skin problems. This eMedTV resource describes how this medication works and lists potential side effects. Ultravat is a common misspelling of Ultravate.
  • Ultravate
    Ultravate is a skin medicine prescribed to treat various conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV Web selection gives an overview of this topical steroid medicine, including how it works, possible side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Ultravate and Breastfeeding
    Women who use Ultravate (halobetasol) while breastfeeding may be putting their child at risk for problems. This eMedTV page covers whether this drug passes through breast milk and explains why it may not be safe for breastfeeding women to use this drug.
  • Ultravate and Pregnancy
    Ultravate (halobetasol) is a highly potent steroid and may not be safe for use by pregnant women. This eMedTV Web page describes what happened when steroids like Ultravate were given to pregnant animals and discusses what your doctor may recommend.
  • Ultravate Cream
    A doctor may prescribe Ultravate cream or ointment to treat skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema. This eMedTV article describes how this medicine works and offers general dosing guidelines. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Ultravate Dosage
    When using Ultravate, apply a thin layer on the affected areas of the skin once or twice daily. This eMedTV article explains why you should not use this medicine for more than two weeks and provides more specific Ultravate dosing guidelines.
  • Ultravate Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that although Ultravate is unlikely to cause negative interactions with most drugs, there are some medicines that should not be combined with Ultravate. This article lists these drugs and explains the reactions that may occur.
  • Ultravate Medication Information
    Ultravate is prescribed for treating eczema, poison ivy, and other skin problems. This eMedTV Web page examines Ultravate, with information on this medication's possible side effects and safety precautions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ultravate Ointment
    Eczema, psoriasis, and various other skin problems may be treated with Ultravate ointment and cream. This eMedTV resource discusses what this topical drug is used for, how it works, and general safety precautions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ultravate Overdose
    Long-term use of Ultravate (halobetasol) may lead to problems like Cushing's syndrome. This eMedTV Web page describes other potential complications that may occur with an Ultravate overdose and explains how your doctor may treat any symptoms that result.
  • Ultravate Side Effects
    Skin irritation, such as burning or stinging, are some of the most common side effects of Ultravate. This eMedTV segment lists other possible reactions to this medicine, including long-term complications and potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Ultravate Uses
    Adults and children as young as age 12 may use Ultravate to treat eczema, psoriasis, or other skin problems. This eMedTV page describes other approved uses for Ultravate, and explains how the skin medicine works to relieve inflammation and itching.
  • Ultravate Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Ultravate if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or are taking certain drugs. This eMedTV page covers important precautions and safety warnings for Ultravate, including what your doctor needs to know about your medical history.
  • Understanding Alopecia Areata
    Alopecia areata is a condition that can lead to patches of hair loss. This eMedTV article hopes to provide you with a basic understanding of what alopecia areata is, what causes it, how it is treated, and more.
  • Ustekinumab
    Ustekinumab is an injectable drug used to treat plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. This article from the eMedTV site provides more info on this product, explaining how it works, possible side effects, safety precautions to be aware of, and more.
  • Ustekinumab Dosage
    If you weigh less than 220 pounds, the recommended ustekinumab dose is 45 mg. This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at the dosing guidelines for this prescription drug, with helpful information on when and how the injections should be given.
  • Ustekinumab Drug Information
    Some types of plaque psoriasis can be treated with ustekinumab. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at this prescription drug, including details on how it is used. A link to more in-depth information on ustekinumab is also provided.
  • Verdeso
    Available by prescription only, Verdeso is used to treat atopic dermatitis. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at this medicated skin foam, including specific uses, how it works, how to apply it, safety precautions, and more.
  • Verdeso and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Verdeso (desonide foam) passes through breast milk or if it would harm a nursing baby. This eMedTV Web page discusses whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Verdeso and covers what your doctor might recommend.
  • Verdeso and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for a woman to use Verdeso (desonide foam) during pregnancy. This eMedTV article takes a look at what happened when steroids were given to pregnant animals and explains why this drug is classified as a pregnancy Category C medicine.
  • Verdeso Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, dosing guidelines for Verdeso include applying a thin layer of the foam onto the affected areas of the skin twice daily. This page takes a closer look at when and how to use this medicine for treating atopic dermatitis.
  • Verdeso Drug Interactions
    If you are using certain medicines, you may not be able to use Verdeso due to potential drug interactions. This eMedTV resource lists the medications that may cause problems when combined with Verdeso and describes the complications that may occur.
  • Verdeso Medication Information
    This eMedTV page offers information on Verdeso, a medication prescribed to treat atopic dermatitis in adults and children. This page gives a brief overview of possible side effects and general safety precautions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Verdeso Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, using too much Verdeso (desonide foam) for a long time may lead to Cushing's syndrome or cause your body to no longer make its own natural steroids. This page lists other potential overdose problems and treatment options.
  • Verdeso Side Effects
    Coughing, headaches, and burning at the application site are some of the possible side effects of Verdeso. This eMedTV page outlines other possible problems this medicated skin foam may cause, including some of the long-term complications that may occur.
  • Verdeso Uses
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Verdeso to treat atopic dermatitis in adults and children. This eMedTV resource explores specific uses of Verdeso, including possible off-label uses. An explanation of how the drug works is also provided.
  • Verdeso Warnings and Precautions
    People with certain allergies or who are taking certain drugs may not be able to safely use Verdeso. This eMedTV page covers important safety warnings and precautions with Verdeso, including problems this steroid may cause when not used as directed.
  • Vetiligo
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, vitiligo is a pigmentation disorder that causes white patches of skin and gray hair on the body. This page also describes risk factors and treatment options. Vetiligo is a common misspelling of vitiligo.
  • Vidlogo
    Vitiligo is a disease that results in pigmentation problems with the skin and hair. This eMedTV page covers possible causes and treatment options for vitiligo. A link to more information is also provided. Vidlogo is a common misspelling of vitiligo.
  • Viral Staph Infections
    As this eMedTV segment explains, staph infections are not viral -- they are caused by bacteria. This article takes a closer look at the different types of staph bacteria and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Vitaligo
    Vitiligo is a pigmentation disorder that may affect the skin and hair. This eMedTV Web article takes a further look at vitiligo, including information on various treatment options and general statistics. Vitaligo is a common misspelling of vitiligo.
  • Vitilago
    As this eMedTV page explains, vitiligo affects the pigmentation of the skin and hair, resulting in white patches of skin on the body and prematurely gray hair. This page also covers possible treatment options. Vitilago is a common misspelling of vitiligo.
  • Vitilgo
    When a person has vitiligo, he or she has patches of white skin on certain areas of the body. This eMedTV Web segment discusses what this disorder involves and describes possible treatment options. Vitilgo is a common misspelling of vitiligo.
  • Vitiligo
    Vitiligo is a skin disorder characterized by white patches that can appear on various parts of the body. This eMedTV resource provides an in-depth look at the condition, including possible causes, risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options.
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