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Diagnosing Body Lice - Drug Interactions With Clobetasol Propionate

This page contains links to eMedTV Skin Articles containing information on subjects from Diagnosing Body Lice to Drug Interactions With Clobetasol Propionate. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Diagnosing Body Lice
    When diagnosing body lice, checking a person's clothing is a good place to start. This eMedTV article offers an overview on how a diagnosis of body lice is made, including information on how infestations are more common during winter months.
  • Diagnosing Contact Dermatitis
    Your doctor will examine your rash and ask several questions when diagnosing contact dermatitis. This eMedTV article outlines the steps involved in making a contact dermatitis diagnosis and also explains why patch testing is sometimes used.
  • Diagnosing Lichen Sclerosus
    To diagnose lichen sclerosus, a biopsy is often performed, especially in early or mild cases of the disease. This eMedTV article explains the process doctors use when diagnosing lichen sclerosus.
  • Diclofenac Gel
    Diclofenac gel is a medicated skin gel commonly prescribed to treat osteoarthritis or actinic keratosis. This eMedTV article offers information on how to use the gel, explains how the medicine works, and lists some of its possible side effects.
  • Diclofenac Gel Dosage
    The standard dosage of diclofenac gel for treating osteoarthritis is 2 or 4 grams applied four times a day. This eMedTV segment also provides dosing guidelines for the treatment of actinic keratosis and offers tips for using the skin gel.
  • Diclofenac Gel Drug Information
    A prescription medicine, diclofenac gel is licensed for the treatment of osteoarthritis. This eMedTV page gives an overview of diclofenac gel, with information on the drug's other approved use, safety issues to discuss with your doctor, and more.
  • Diflorasone Cream
    Diflorasone emollient cream is prescribed to treat a variety of skin problems, such as psoriasis and eczema. This eMedTV Web page describes how this medicine works, lists side effects, and more. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate
    Diflorasone diacetate is a medicine prescribed to treat certain conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV Web selection gives an overview of this topical steroid, including how it works, possible side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate and Breastfeeding
    Women who use diflorasone diacetate while breastfeeding may be putting their child at risk for problems. This eMedTV page covers whether this drug passes through breast milk and explains why it may not be safe for nursing women to use this drug.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate and Pregnancy
    Diflorasone diacetate is a steroid and therefore may not be safe for use by pregnant women. This eMedTV Web page describes what happened when steroids like diflorasone diacetate were given to pregnant animals and discusses what your doctor may recommend.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Cream
    This page of the eMedTV library presents a brief overview of diflorasone diacetate, which comes in cream and ointment forms. It lists a few of the conditions this prescription drug can treat and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Dosage
    A thin layer of diflorasone diacetate is applied to affected areas of the skin up to three times daily. This eMedTV article provides tips to ensure a safe treatment process, as well as more specific diflorasone diacetate dosing guidelines.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Drug Information
    Diflorasone diacetate is used for eczema, poison ivy, and other skin problems. This eMedTV Web page briefly explores this drug, with information on possible side effects, available forms, and treatment tips. A link to more details is also included.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that although diflorasone diacetate is unlikely to interact with most drugs, there are some products that should not be combined with it. This article lists these drugs and explains the negative reactions that may occur.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Ointment
    This segment of the eMedTV archives describes when and how to use diflorasone diacetate (both the ointment and cream forms). It also explains what not to do during treatment and includes a link to more information on this topic.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Overdose
    Long-term use of diflorasone diacetate may lead to problems like Cushing's syndrome. This eMedTV Web page describes other potential complications that may occur with a diflorasone diacetate overdose and explains how it likely will be treated.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Side Effects
    Reactions at the application site are some of the most common diflorasone diacetate side effects. This eMedTV segment lists other possible reactions to this medicine, including long-term complications and potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Uses
    This eMedTV page explains why doctors often recommend the use of diflorasone diacetate to treat eczema, psoriasis, or other skin problems. This page describes other approved uses for the drug and explains how it works to relieve inflammation and itching.
  • Diflorasone Diacetate Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page explains why you may not be able to use diflorasone diacetate if you have certain allergies or conditions. This page covers important precautions and warnings for diflorasone diacetate, including what your doctor needs to know.
  • Diflorasone Diocetate Cream
    This segment of the eMedTV archives presents a brief overview of diflorasone diacetate cream, which is used to treat eczema, psoriasis, and other skin conditions. Diflorasone diocetate cream is a common misspelling of diflorasone diacetate cream.
  • Diflorasone Emollient Cream
    Diflorasone emollient cream is prescribed to treat dermatitis, eczema, and various other skin conditions. This eMedTV article describes how this medicine works to treat itching and inflammation, explains how it works, and lists possible side effects.
  • Diflorasone Emollient Cream Dosage
    This eMedTV Web selection presents dosing guidelines for diflorasone emollient cream, including some tips on when and how to apply this skin cream. This article also discusses the factors that your doctor will consider when determining your dosage.
  • Diflorasone Emollient Cream Information
    Diflorasone emollient cream is available by prescription and used for treating many different skin problems. This eMedTV resource provides more information on diflorasone emollient cream, including specific uses, dosing tips, and potential side effects.
  • Diflorasone Emollient Cream Side Effects
    Some people may have allergic skin reactions or other problems while using diflorasone emollient cream. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other potential problems that may occur while using this skin cream, including common and serious reactions.
  • Diflorisone Diacetate
    Psoriasis, eczema, and other conditions are often treated with diflorasone diacetate. This eMedTV resource discusses the drug's uses and forms, with a link to more information. Diflorisone diacetate is a common misspelling of diflorasone diacetate.
  • Diflorosone
    This eMedTV segment explains that the FDA has licensed diflorasone to treat skin conditions that cause itching and inflammation. It discusses treatment directions and links to more information. Diflorosone is a common misspelling of diflorasone.
  • Does Hydrogen Peroxide Damage the Liver?
    Many people want to know if liver damage can occur as a result of taking hydrogen peroxide internally. This eMedTV addresses this issue, explaining that although liver damage is unlikely, taking hydrogen peroxide by IV or mouth is far from safe.
  • Does Mangosteen Work?
    This eMedTV page addresses the question, "Does mangosteen work?" Although the product is claimed to have several medicinal benefits, more research is necessary to prove the effectiveness of this supplement for any use.
  • Does Neosporin Heal Scrapes?
    Research has shown that scrapes can be healed with Neosporin. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses whether this first aid treatment is effective in preventing infections, as well as whether this medication can help reduce scarring.
  • Drinking Hydrogen Peroxide
    Hydrogen peroxide is not meant to be taken internally, as it can cause dangerous side effects. This eMedTV Web article talks about why drinking hydrogen peroxide is a bad idea and offers details on when serious problems are most likely to occur.
  • Drug Interactions With AbobotulinumtoxinA
    As this eMedTV segment explains, abobotulinumtoxinA may interact with Botox, Benadryl, and a number of other medications. This article discusses the effects of these drug interactions and explains the importance of talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Drug Interactions With Acitretin
    Diabetes medications and tetracyclines can cause negative drug interactions with acitretin. This eMedTV Web segment lists other medications that may interfere with acitretin and describes the complications that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Adapalene/Benzoyl Peroxide
    Skin reactions may occur when adapalene/benzoyl peroxide is used with other skin products. This eMedTV page explains that while serious drug interactions with adapalene/benzoyl peroxide are unlikely, certain soaps and cosmetics may cause skin irritation.
  • Drug Interactions With Alclometasone
    Aldesleukin and corticorelin can become less effective when combined with alclometasone. This eMedTV article provides a discussion on how to avoid drug interactions with alclometasone and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Drug Interactions With Alefacept
    As explained in this portion of the eMedTV library, alefacept can interfere with several drugs, including polio vaccine, echinacea, and other immunosuppressants. This article takes an in-depth look at these and other potential interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Amcinonide
    Applying amcinonide on the skin may interfere with certain medicines, such as aldesleukin and corticorelin. This eMedTV article provides a discussion on how to avoid drug interactions with amcinonide and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Drug Interactions With Azelaic Acid Gel
    Skin reactions may occur when azelaic acid gel is used with certain other skin products. This eMedTV page explains that while serious drug interactions with azelaic acid gel are unlikely, certain lotions and cosmetics may cause skin irritation.
  • Drug Interactions With Azficel-T
    Celecoxib, ibuprofen, and other drugs can increase your risk of bruising during azficel-T treatment. This eMedTV selection looks at other products that can react with azficel-T, explaining why it's important to discuss interactions with your doctor.
  • Drug Interactions With Benzyl Alcohol Lotion
    It is unlikely that other drugs would react with benzyl alcohol lotion. This eMedTV article talks about the possibility of drug interactions with benzyl alcohol lotion, explaining how interactions could be discovered in the future.
  • Drug Interactions With Betamethasone Valerate Foam
    Taking certain drugs in combination with betamethasone valerate foam may cause negative interactions. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of these interactions and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Drug Interactions With Botulinum Toxin Type A
    Drug interactions may occur if botulinum toxin type A is taken with botulinum toxin type B. This eMedTV Web page lists other substances that can cause drug interactions with botulinum toxin type A and also explains the effects of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Brimonidine Gel
    As explained in this eMedTV page, a variety of drugs could cause serious interactions with brimonidine gel, so it's important to talk to your healthcare provider before starting this medicine. This article describes problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Calcipotriene
    As this eMedTV resource explains, if calcipotriene is combined with certain drugs, interactions may occur. Examples include thiazide diuretics and lithium. This segment describes other products that could react with calcipotriene and the results.
  • Drug Interactions With Calcipotriene/Betamethasone Dipropionate
    As explained in this eMedTV page, taking certain medications in combination with calcipotriene/betamethasone propionate may cause interactions. This article describes the effects of these reactions and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Drug Interactions With Calcitriol Ointment
    Using thiazide diuretics or calcium with calcitriol ointment may lead to potential drug interactions. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at what might happen when these medications are used together and describes how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Clemastine
    Alcohol, MAOIs, and phenothiazines may cause negative clemastine drug interactions. This eMedTV Web page includes a list of other products that may interfere with clemastine and describes the problems that may occur if these drugs are combined.
  • Drug Interactions With Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide
    Erythromycin medications are just a few of the drugs that can interact with clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide. This eMedTV page lists other drugs that can react with this acne skin gel and explains what can happen when the medications are combined.
  • Drug Interactions With Clobetasol Propionate
    This eMedTV page explains that clobetasol propionate is unlikely to cause negative interactions with most drugs, but it may decrease the effectiveness of aldesleukin or corticorelin. This page explains what your doctor may recommend to reduce your risk.
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