Skin Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Skin Articles A-Z

Cellulitis - Clobox

This page contains links to eMedTV Skin Articles containing information on subjects from Cellulitis to Clobox. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Cellulitis
    Cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that most often affects the extremities. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this condition, including information about its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Cellulitis Diagnosis
    A cellulitis diagnosis may be made by examining the affected area. As this eMedTV resource explains, skin affected by cellulitis will be red, warm to the touch, swollen, and painful. This article explains the steps involved in diagnosing cellulitis.
  • Cellulitis Risk Factors
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, cellulitis risk factors include breaks in the skin, vein problems, swelling of the leg, and obesity. This article provides specific examples of risk factors for cellulitis, such as skin ulcers and eczema.
  • Cellulitis Symptoms
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, symptoms of cellulitis include skin that is red, swollen, warm, and painful to the touch. Other symptoms may include fever and chills. This article offers a closer look at possible signs and symptoms of this condition.
  • Learn About Cellulitis Treatment
    As this eMedTV segment explains, treatment for cellulitis usually begins with antibiotics; they may be given orally or through an IV. Along with antibiotics, treatment may also involve preventing a recurrence of the infection.
  • Cellulitis Types
    As this eMedTV page explains, cellulitis of the extremities is the most common type. This Web resource talks about this condition and its symptoms in more detail, and includes a link to the full-length article on the different cellulitis types.
  • Cellulitus
    Cellulitis is a skin infection caused by bacteria that typically affects the legs, feet, arms, and hands. This eMedTV page provides an overview of the condition and offers a link to more information. Cellulitus is a common misspelling of cellulitis.
  • Celulites
    As this eMedTV resource explains, cellulitis is a type of bacterial infection that affects the skin. This page discusses possible symptoms of cellulitis, as well as treatment options that are available. Celulites is a common misspelling of cellulitis.
  • Celulitis
    This eMedTV article explains that cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that is characterized by swelling, redness, and pain. What causes the condition and treatment options are also explained. Celulitis is a common misspelling of cellulitis.
  • Celulitus
    Cellulitis, which this eMedTV segment describes, is a bacterial infection affecting the legs, feet, arms, and eyes. The cause of the infection and its identifying characteristics are also described. Celulitus is a common misspelling of cellulitis.
  • Cinryze
    Cinryze is used to prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in adults and teenagers. This eMedTV Web page outlines more details on this prescription medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Cinryze and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown whether Cinryze passes through breast milk. This eMedTV Web page examines why women who have hereditary angioedema may still be advised to use this drug while nursing. It also lists possible side effects to watch for in your infant.
  • Cinryze and Pregnancy
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library contains a discussion on the safety issues surrounding the use of Cinryze during pregnancy. It takes a look at whether research has been done on this topic and explains what your doctor may advise.
  • Cinryze Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Cinryze is injected into a vein every three or four days to prevent hereditary angioedema attacks. More dosing tips are outlined in this article, including helpful suggestions for when and how to use the injections.
  • Cinryze Drug Interactions
    There are no known drug interactions with Cinryze at this time. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, you should still tell your doctor about all other medications and supplements you are taking in case interactions are discovered in the future.
  • Cinryze Medication Information
    Cinryze is a medicine approved to help prevent sudden attacks of hereditary angioedema. This eMedTV Web selection contains information on Cinryze, including who this medication is designed for, potential side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Cinryze Overdose
    As this part of the eMedTV Web library explains, a Cinryze overdose may cause a rash, blood clots, or other complications. This page describes other possible effects and lists some of the ways these problems may be treated.
  • Cinryze Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, possible Cinryze side effects include a rash, fever, and reactions at the injection site. This page also describes potentially serious problems that can occur with this drug and explains when treatment is needed.
  • Cinryze Uses
    Cinryze is prescribed to prevent swelling that occurs during an attack of hereditary angioedema (HAE). This eMedTV page explains how Cinryze is used to prevent these attacks. It also offers an explanation on how this drug works and who it is designed for.
  • Cinryze Warnings and Precautions
    Serious allergic reactions, strokes, and other problems are associated with using Cinryze. This eMedTV article presents a list of safety precautions to be aware of with Cinryze, including warnings for people who should not use this medication.
  • Clemastine
    Clemastine is an antihistamine drug licensed to treat allergies, the common cold, and allergic reactions. This eMedTV segment discusses the drug in more detail, including information on how it works, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Clemastine and Breastfeeding
    Clemastine is an antihistamine medication that is known to pass through breast milk. This part of the eMedTV site provides more information about breastfeeding and clemastine, and explains how this drug could affect breast milk production.
  • Clemastine and Pregnancy
    Clemastine is generally considered to be safe for use during pregnancy. This section of the eMedTV library offers a more in-depth look at pregnancy and clemastine, including information on how this medicine can be used off-label in pregnant women.
  • Clemastine Dosage
    The standard recommended dosage for non-prescription clemastine is one tablet every 12 hours. This eMedTV article also provides dosage guidelines for prescription clemastine tablets and syrup, and explains how dosing works for children.
  • Clemastine Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, clemastine is approved for the treatment of allergies, allergic reactions, and the common cold. This page takes a closer look at this drug, with helpful information on ensuring a safe treatment.
  • Clemastine Overdose
    An overdose of clemastine may result in constipation, hallucinations, and rapid heart rate. This eMedTV resource explores the other possible effects of an overdose with this drug and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • Clindamycin Benzoyl Peroxide Gel
    If you have acne, your healthcare provider may prescribe a skin gel called clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide. This eMedTV segment gives a brief introduction to this product, explaining when and how to use it. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide
    Clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide is a skin gel used to treat acne. This selection from the eMedTV Web site gives an overview of this prescription product, with detailed information on topics such as side effects, dosing, available strengths, and more.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide (Acanya, BenzaClin, Duac) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV resource tells you what you need to know about breastfeeding and clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide, including the manufacturer's recommendation.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide and Pregnancy
    The FDA has given a pregnancy Category C rating to clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide. This part of the eMedTV Web site explains what this means and offers information on what to do if you become pregnant while using this acne medication.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Dosage
    Clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide comes in gel form and is normally used one or two times a day. This eMedTV Web segment explains when and how to apply clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide, with several tips to help you get the most out of each dose.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Information
    This eMedTV Web page offers information on clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide, a skin gel used to treat acne. Topics covered in this article include side effects, dosing, and what to discuss with your doctor. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV article, swollen skin and burning at the application site are some of the symptoms of a clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide overdose. This page takes a look at what to expect in the case of an overdose, including treatment options.
  • Clindamycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Side Effects
    Common clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide side effects include skin redness, dryness, and itching. This eMedTV selection lists other potential side effects of this skin gel, including ones that are potentially dangerous and require immediate medical care.
  • Clobatasol
    Clobetasol propionate is a drug prescribed to treat various skin conditions. This eMedTV page explains how this steroid works, describes possible side effects, and lists specific uses of this medicine. Clobatasol is a common misspelling of clobetasol.
  • Clobetasol Foam
    If you have dermatitis, psoriasis, or eczema, a doctor may prescribe clobetasol propionate foam. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief description of what this medication is used for and how it works. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Clobetasol Lotion
    This eMedTV segment gives some basic dosing guidelines for clobetasol lotion, which is sold under the name Clobex. This article also lists the other forms in which clobetasol is available and includes a link to the full-length article on this medicine.
  • Clobetasol Propatiate
    As this eMedTV page explains, clobetasol propionate is prescribed to treat psoriasis, eczema, and certain other skin problems. A list of side effects and dosing tips is also included. Clobetasol propatiate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Propinate
    Clobetasol propionate is a prescription drug licensed to treat various skin conditions. This eMedTV segment explains how this drug works and lists possible side effects. Clobetasol propinate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Propionate
    Clobetasol propionate is a steroid used to treat inflammation and itching due to various skin conditions. This eMedTV article covers side effects, dosing tips, and how this prescription drug works to treat eczema, dermatitis, and other skin problems.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Dosage
    This eMedTV Web selection explores the specific dosing guidelines for clobetasol propionate, which generally call for a small amount to be applied to the affected skin areas once or twice daily. This page also offer tips on how to safely use this drug.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Drug Information
    Clobetasol propionate is a medicine prescribed for treating psoriasis, eczema, and other skin problems. This eMedTV page offers more drug information on clobetasol propionate, including the various forms available, dosing tips, and safety precautions.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Foam
    Clobetasol propionate foam is prescribed to treat skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema. This eMedTV page explains how this steroid works to treat skin itching and inflammation, lists potential side effects, and describes when and how to apply it.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Foam Dosage
    This eMedTV Web selection explains that the clobetasol propionate foam dosage is usually a capful of the foam applied to the affected areas twice daily for up to two weeks. This page further explores dosing guidelines and tips for using this medicine.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Foam Information
    Clobetasol propionate foam is available by prescription and is used for various skin conditions. This eMedTV Web selection offers more information on clobetasol propionate foam, including specific uses, side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Foam Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, side effects of clobetasol propionate foam may include skin reactions and suppression of the adrenal glands. This page lists other reactions, including long-term effects and serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Clobetasol Propionate Side Effects
    While clobetasol propionate is usually well tolerated, it can cause problems like infections and swelling. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible side effects of clobetasol propionate, including long-term or potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Clobetasol Proprionate
    Clobetasol propionate is a drug commonly used to treat a wide variety of skin conditions. This eMedTV resource explains how this prescription steroid works and possible side effects. Clobetasol proprionate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Propronate
    Clobetasol propionate is a drug licensed to treat certain skin problems, such as eczema or psoriasis. This eMedTV page covers what to tell your doctor before using this skin medicine. Clobetasol proponate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Prorionate
    Clobetasol propionate is a steroid used for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and covers some general dosing tips. Clobetasol prorionate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Prpionate
    Clobetasol propionate is a medicine prescribed to treat skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV page explores this drug, including how it works and dosing tips. Clobetasol prpionate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Ptoponate
    As this eMedTV page explains, clobetasol propionate is used to treat a wide variety of skin conditions. This article discusses how this prescription drug works and how to apply it. Clobetasol ptoponate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetasol Shampoo
    The dosing guidelines for clobetasol shampoo call for a once-daily application. This article from the eMedTV Web library explains how to use this prescription product and provides a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Clobetesol Propionate
    As this eMedTV article explains, clobetasol propionate is prescribed to treat a wide variety of skin conditions. This page discusses how this steroid works and covers safety concerns. Clobetesol propionate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetisol Propionate
    Clobetasol propionate is a medicine prescribed to treat a variety of inflammatory skin conditions. This eMedTV page takes a look at this drug, including how it works and side effects. Clobetisol propionate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobetsol
    Clobetasol propionate is a drug licensed to treat certain skin conditions, such as eczema and dermatitis. This eMedTV page lists the various forms available and covers what your doctor needs to know. Clobetsol is a common misspelling of clobetasol.
  • Clobetsol Propionate
    Clobetasol propionate is a medicine prescribed to treat various skin conditions. This eMedTV page takes a look at how this steroid works, the various forms available, and dosing tips. Clobetsol propionate is a common misspelling of clobetasol propionate.
  • Clobex
    Clobex, a steroid medication, is used to treat skin conditions such as scalp psoriasis. This part of the eMedTV site offers more details on this prescription product, including how it works, what to expect during treatment, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Clobex Active Ingredient
    Although Clobex comes in three different formulations, the active ingredient is the same for all of them. This eMedTV Web page lists the active ingredient and provides a link to more in-depth information on this topical steroid.
  • Clobex and Breastfeeding
    It is not entirely clear if it is safe to use Clobex (clobetasol propionate) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV selection addresses whether Clobex passes through breast milk and explains why it's important to discuss this with your healthcare provider.
  • Clobex and Pregnancy
    If you are pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider before using Clobex (clobetasol propionate). This eMedTV Web resource talks about the safety of using this topical steroid during pregnancy, including why the FDA considers it a Category C drug.
  • Clobex Dosage
    With Clobex, the dosing instructions will be based on which form of the drug you are using. This part of the eMedTV library covers the dosing guidelines for this topical medication, including the maximum length of time it should be used.
  • Clobex Drug Information
    Clobex is a steroid used for eczema, contact dermatitis, and other skin conditions. This eMedTV Web selection gives an overview of this drug, with information on side effects and dosing guidelines. A link to more details on Clobex is also included.
  • Clobex Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV article explains, using aldesleukin or corticorelin together with Clobex may result in drug interactions. This Web page looks at the complications these reactions might cause and what your healthcare provider may do to minimize your risk.
  • Clobex Generic Name
    As explained in this page from the eMedTV archives, clobetasol propionate is the generic name for Clobex, a steroidal medication used to treat certain skin conditions. This article gives a brief overview of this topic and provides a link to more details.
  • Clobex Lotion
    As this eMedTV page explains, Clobex can be found in different products, including a lotion that is applied twice a day. This article gives a summary of Clobex Lotion, with details on how long it should be used and some of the side effects that may occur.
  • Clobex Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV page, a potentially dangerous result of a Clobex (clobetasol propionate) overdose is a condition in which your body stops producing its own natural steroids. This page describes what to expect with an overdose of this drug.
  • Clobex Shampoo
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV library, Clobex Shampoo is approved for the treatment of scalp psoriasis. This article takes a quick look at when and how to use this product. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Clobex Side Effects
    One of the most common side effects of Clobex is a burning sensation at the application site. This eMedTV segment takes you through the possible side effects of the different forms of this steroid medication, including what to do if problems occur.
  • Clobex Spray
    If you have plaque psoriasis, your healthcare provider may recommend a product called Clobex Spray. This eMedTV resource talks briefly about how to apply this medication and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Clobex Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV Web article, Clobex can be prescribed for seborrhea, dermatitis, eczema, and other skin conditions. This resource takes an in-depth look at the uses of Clobex, including details on how it works and who can use it.
  • Clobex Warnings and Precautions
    Using Clobex for extended periods increases your risk for complications. This eMedTV selection provides other important warnings and precautions to reduce your risk of problems while using Clobex, including details on who should avoid the drug entirely.
  • Clobix
    Clobex, a steroidal drug, has been shown to be an effective treatment for eczema and other skin conditions. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of this medicine and provides a link to more details. Clobix is a common misspelling of Clobex.
  • Clobox
    You may benefit from Clobex if you have a skin condition like psoriasis or eczema. This eMedTV selection offers some basic information on this medication and includes a link to more details. Clobox is a common misspelling of Clobex.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.