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Atopic Dermatitis Skin Care - Causes of Vitiligo

This page contains links to eMedTV Skin Articles containing information on subjects from Atopic Dermatitis Skin Care to Causes of Vitiligo. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Atopic Dermatitis Skin Care
    Following a daily atopic dermatitis skin care routine is an essential part of preventing flareups. This eMedTV article offers a few tips, including what not to do. For example, moisturizing the skin is important, but bath oils are not recommended.
  • Atopic Dermatitis Treatment
    This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at atopic dermatitis treatment options, ranging from topical steroids and oral medications to ultraviolet light therapy. Possible side effects of each are also described.
  • Avage
    Avage is a skin cream used to treat fine facial wrinkling and other signs of overexposure to the sun. This eMedTV segment talks about this prescription drug in detail, with information on side effects, how to apply it, and how it works.
  • Avage and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if Avage (tazarotene) is safe to use while nursing. This eMedTV segment talks about breastfeeding and Avage, explaining the results of animal studies on the topic and stressing the importance of consulting your healthcare provider.
  • Avage and Pregnancy
    If you are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant, you should not use Avage (tazarotene). This eMedTV page explains the dangers Avage presents for women who are expecting and explains what to do if you accidentally become pregnant while using it.
  • Avage Cream Information
    Available as a skin cream, Avage is a prescription product used to treat sun-damaged skin. This segment of the eMedTV archives provides more information on this medication, explaining how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Avage Dosage
    Typically, only a pea-sized amount of Avage is needed each day. This eMedTV article offers more details on when and how to use the skin cream, including information on why pregnant women must pay special attention to Avage dosing guidelines.
  • Avage Drug Interactions
    Some of the drugs that can interact with Avage include "sulfa drugs" and tetracycline antibiotics. This eMedTV selection takes you through the medications that can interfere with Avage and describes some of the potential results of these interactions.
  • Avage Overdose
    If you use too much Avage, you may experience overdose symptoms like significant peeling of the skin. This eMedTV Web selection explains what can happen with an overdose of this drug and explains some of the treatment options available.
  • Avage Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV Web resource, peeling skin is the most commonly reported Avage side effect. This article provides a detailed list of other common side effects of the skin cream and explains what to do if such problems occur during treatment.
  • Avage Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Avage is used to treat fine facial wrinkling and other signs of too much sun exposure. The prescription cream also has several off-label uses, which are discussed in this article as well.
  • Avage Warnings and Precautions
    Don't use Avage if you are pregnant, or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients used to make the drug. This eMedTV selection lists a number of other precautions to be aware of before using Avage, including warnings on avoiding sun exposure.
  • Azelaic Acid Gel
    Available by prescription only, azelaic acid gel is a drug that treats rosacea. This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at this medication, providing information on when and how to use it, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Azelaic Acid Gel Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the standard dosing recommendations for azelaic acid gel are to apply the gel to the affected area twice daily. This page explains why it may take several weeks for this drug to work and lists several tips for using this gel.
  • Azelaic Acid Gel Drug Information
    Azelaic acid gel is used to treat rosacea in adults. This article from the eMedTV Web library further discusses this prescription drug, including information on how azelaic acid gel works, when and how to use it, and potential side effects.
  • Azficel-T
    Azficel-T is a personalized cell therapy used for cosmetic purposes. This eMedTV Web selection provides a complete overview of this treatment, explaining its main use, what to expect, dosing guidelines, and why it may not be right for everyone.
  • Azficel-T Dosage
    Azficel-T is a facial injection that is given three times, with three to six weeks between injections. This eMedTV resource gives dosing instructions for people receiving azficel-T, with details on how this drug will be made from your own cells.
  • Azficel-T Drug Information
    If you are bothered by the appearance of smile lines, your healthcare provider may recommend azficel-T. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of azficel-T, with information on how the drug is administered and how to ensure your safety.
  • Azficel-T Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, redness and swelling are among the most common side effects of azficel-T. This resource lists other possible reactions to this facial filler, including serious reactions that require urgent medical attention.
  • Beherrschung der Atopischen Dermatitis
    Beherrschung der Atopischen Dermatitis
  • Benzyl Alcohol Lotion
    If you have head lice, a healthcare provider may prescribe benzyl alcohol lotion. This eMedTV Web article offers an in-depth look at this medicated lotion, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Benzyl Alcohol Lotion Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, your dose of benzyl alcohol lotion will depend on how long your hair is. This page further discusses dosing guidelines for this medicine, including tips on how to safely and effectively use it.
  • Benzyl Alcohol Lotion Information
    Benzyl alcohol lotion is a prescription medication used to treat head lice. This eMedTV Web selection provides more information on benzyl alcohol lotion, including how to use this medicine, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Betamethasone Valerate Foam
    Your healthcare provider may recommend betamethasone valerate foam if you have scalp psoriasis. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at this medication, listing other conditions it can treat, dosing guidelines, safety warnings, and more.
  • Betamethasone Valerate Foam Dosage
    The recommended dose of betamethasone valerate foam is the same for everyone. This eMedTV resource explains how many times a day this product should be used and how long treatment generally lasts. Tips for getting the most out of each dose are also given.
  • Betamethasone Valerate Foam Information
    Betamethasone valerate foam may be prescribed if you have scalp psoriasis or certain other skin conditions. This eMedTV page gives an overview of betamethasone valerate foam, with information on how to use it and other conditions it can treat.
  • Betamethasone Valerate Foam Side Effects
    If you are using betamethasone valerate foam, you may develop reactions like itching or burning. This eMedTV page offers a more detailed list of side effects that can occur with betamethasone valerate foam, including those requiring prompt medical care.
  • Body Lice
    Body lice are wingless, small insects that live primarily on clothing. This eMedTV page offers an in-depth look at body lice, explaining how they are transmitted, diagnosed, and treated. This page also explains how they may transmit certain diseases.
  • Botulinum Toxin Type A
    Botulinum toxin type A is used to treat frown lines and wrinkles, but can be used for other conditions, too. This eMedTV page gives an overview of this product, explaining how it's used, the drug's effects, dosing information, and possible side effects.
  • Botulinum Toxin Type A (Botox Cosmetic)
    Botulinum toxin type A, more commonly known as Botox, is one of the most popular cosmetic treatments around. This eMedTV segment provides a brief discussion of this product, with information on why the name was changed and how it works.
  • Botulinum Toxin Type A Dosing
    Botulinum toxin type A dosing guidelines consider various factors, which this eMedTV page lists. This page also explains how the drug works to treat different conditions and offers tips on when and how to take your botulinum toxin type A injection.
  • Breast Cellulitis
    Breast cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that occurs on the breast. As this eMedTV article explains, skin affected by cellulitis will commonly be red, swollen, and warm and painful to the touch. Breast cellulitis is treated with antibiotics.
  • Brimonidine Gel
    Brimonidine gel is prescribed to help treat rosacea. This eMedTV Web selection offers a comprehensive look at this prescription medicine, including how to apply it, possible side effects, and more. It also provides links to specific topics.
  • Brimonidine Gel Dosage
    The standard dose of brimonidine gel requires applying a thin layer of the gel on your skin once daily. This eMedTV article further explores treatment guidelines, including details on when and how to use this drug and how long the effects will last.
  • Brimonidine Gel Information
    By causing the blood vessels to constrict, brimonidine gel can treat redness caused by rosacea. This eMedTV resource contains basic information on brimonidine gel, including how this drug works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Brimonidine Gel Side Effects
    If you use brimonidine gel for treating rosacea, you may develop a burning sensation or facial flushing. This eMedTV page outlines other possible brimonidine gel side effects, including reactions that are potentially severe and require medical care.
  • Calcipotriene
    Calcipotriene is a medication approved for the treatment of a certain type of psoriasis. This page of the eMedTV site takes an in-depth look at this prescription drug, with information on when and how to take it, side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Calcipotriene Dosage
    When using calcipotriene, a dose is usually applied once or twice a day to the affected area. As this eMedTV page explains, after applying the drug, you should wash your hands and avoid excessive sun exposure. Other dosing guidelines are also included.
  • Calcipotriene Drug Information
    Plaque psoriasis can often be treated with a medication called calcipotriene. This selection from the eMedTV site provides a brief overview on the drug calcipotriene, with information on side effects, what to tell your doctor before using it, and more.
  • Calcipotriene/Betamethasone Dipropionate
    If you have plaque psoriasis, your healthcare provider may recommend calcipotriene/betamethasone propionate. This eMedTV page gives a complete overview of this prescription drug, including how to use it, what to expect during treatment, and more.
  • Calcipotriene/Betamethasone Dipropionate Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the instructions for calcipotriene/betamethasone dipropionate dosing depend on which form of the drug is being used. This article explains these guidelines in detail, including why it must be used exactly as prescribed.
  • Calcipotriene/Betamethasone Dipropionate Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on calcipotriene/betamethasone dipropionate, a drug used to treat plaque psoriasis. This Web page takes a quick look at this medication and provides a link to more details.
  • Calcipotriene/Betamethasone Dipropionate Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, calcipotriene/betamethasone dipropionate can cause side effects such as itching, headache, and inflammation of hair follicles. This article offers more details on this topic, including what to do if serious problems occur.
  • Calcitriol Ointment
    Calcitriol ointment is an active form of vitamin D used to treat mild-to-moderate plaque psoriasis. This eMedTV resource covers potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and what your doctor needs to know before you begin treatment with this medicine.
  • Calcitriol Ointment Dosage
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that the calcitriol ointment dosage is usually a small amount of the medicine applied to the affected areas twice daily. This page further explores dosing guidelines and tips for using this skin medicine.
  • Calcitriol Ointment Information
    Calcitriol ointment is available by prescription and is used for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. This eMedTV Web selection offers more information on calcitriol ointment, including specific uses, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Calcitriol Ointment Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, side effects of calcitriol ointment may include itching and skin discomfort. This page also describes how this drug may cause high blood calcium levels, which may result in confusion, lethargy, or other serious problems.
  • Can Neosporin Be Used in the Nose?
    This eMedTV article explains that it is generally not a good idea to use Neosporin in the nose, as it may cause serious problems. This page takes a further look at the problems that can occur if these first aid ointments or creams are used in the nose.
  • Can You Drink Hydrogen Peroxide?
    Hydrogen peroxide is not meant to be swallowed. This selection from the eMedTV Web site talks more about taking this product internally and describes some of the serious side effects that can occur if you drink hydrogen peroxide.
  • Can You Put Hydrogen Peroxide in Your Ear?
    As this eMedTV article explains, many people are curious about whether you can put hydrogen peroxide in your ear. This segment describes the use of hydrogen peroxide for earwax removal and provides a link to more information.
  • Can You Put Neosporin in Your Eyes?
    It is typically recommended not to put nonprescription Neosporin in your eyes. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains why several Neosporin products are not usually recommended for treating eye infections anymore.
  • Cancer and Dacarbazine
    A doctor may prescribe dacarbazine to treat cancer in adults. This part of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at what dacarbazine is used for, including details on how this chemotherapy drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Cancer and Vorinostat
    A doctor may prescribe vorinostat to adults with a type of cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this form of chemotherapy treatment, including how this drug works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Capex
    As this eMedTV article explains, Capex is a steroid medication used to treat scalp seborrhea. This resource provides more details on this prescription product, including how it works, what to expect during treatment, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Capex and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if Capex (fluocinolone shampoo) passes through breast milk. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses breastfeeding and Capex in detail, including an explanation of why it's important to talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Capex and Pregnancy
    The FDA classifies Capex (fluocinolone shampoo) as a pregnancy Category C medication. This eMedTV selection looks at the safety of using this drug during pregnancy, with information on how steroids like Capex performed in animal studies.
  • Capex Dosage
    Capex is applied like your normal shampoo, but is not immediately rinsed off the scalp. This eMedTV segment talks in more detail about the dosing guidelines for Capex, with warnings about the potential dangers of long-term use.
  • Capex Drug Interactions
    Taking corticorelin or aldesleukin while using Capex may cause drug interactions. This eMedTV Web selection describes the problems that may occur when these medicines are used together and discusses what your doctor may recommend to avoid complications.
  • Capex Medication Information
    If you have scalp psoriasis, your healthcare provider may recommend a medication called Capex. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at this medicated shampoo, explaining how to use it and what to expect. A link to more details is also included.
  • Capex Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, long-term use of Capex (fluocinolone shampoo) may lead to problems like Cushing's syndrome. This article covers other complications that may occur with a Capex overdose and explains how it likely will be treated.
  • Capex Side Effects
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, side effects of Capex may include itching, burning, and irritation, among others. This page lists other reactions, including potentially serious problems that require medical care and long-term effects of the drug.
  • Capex Uses
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, Capex is used to treat a particular type of seborrhea. This article lists the specific use of this drug, discusses in detail how it works, and also discusses some off-label uses.
  • Capex Warnings and Precautions
    If you use Capex for an extended period, watch for symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. This eMedTV page offers other important safety precautions for Capex, including warnings on who should avoid this steroid product entirely.
  • Cause of Alopecia Areata
    As this eMedTV article explains, the cause of alopecia areata is related to an autoimmune disease, in which your white blood cells attack the hair follicles. This Web page takes a look at what causes this hair loss, including how genetics may play a role.
  • Cause of Cellulites
    The cause of cellulitis is a bacterial infection. As this eMedTV article explains, the group A streptococcus bacterium is one of the types of bacteria that may cause cellulitis. Cause of cellulites is a common misspelling of cause of cellulitis.
  • Cause of Cellulitis
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the most common cause of cellulitis in otherwise healthy adults is the group A streptococcus bacterium. This article also discusses other forms of bacteria that can be linked to cellulitis, such as S. aureus.
  • Causes of Alopecia Areata
    As this eMedTV article explains, the cause of alopecia areata is linked to an autoimmune disease, but it is unknown how the disease slows hair production. This article discusses the possible causes of this condition in greater detail.
  • Causes of Atopic Dermatitis
    This page of the eMedTV library discusses possible causes of atopic dermatitis. For example, research scientists believe that environment and genetics work together to cause the condition; strong emotions can make it worse, but they cannot cause it.
  • Causes of Body Lice
    Body lice is caused by an infestation with a small insect known as Pediculus humanus corporis. This eMedTV segment further discusses the causes of body lice and also provides a detailed description of the insect that causes the infestation.
  • Causes of Contact Dermatitis
    Exposures to soap, solvents, and perfumes are some of the common causes of contact dermatitis. This eMedTV Web page lists other substances that can cause this condition, and also explains the difference between the two types of contact dermatitis.
  • Causes of Lice
    There are three different types of insects that cause lice infestations in humans. This eMedTV resource describes these causes in greater detail, including information on what they look like and how you can reduce your risk of becoming infested.
  • Causes of Lichen Sclerosus
    The causes of lichen sclerosus are unknown, but the immune system and hormone levels may play a role. This eMedTV resource explains these and other potential causes of lichen sclerosus.
  • Causes of Vitiligo
    This eMedTV article lists possible causes of vitiligo and risk factors for the disease, such as hyperthyroidism and Addison's disease. Research also shows that having a family history of vitiligo may increase your risk.
  • Cellulites
    Cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the skin that is characterized by swelling, redness, warmth, and pain. This eMedTV resource explains how the condition is caused, diagnosed, and treated. Cellulites is a common misspelling of cellulitis.
  • Cellulities
    Cellulitis is a bacterial infection that causes swelling, redness, and pain on certain parts of the skin. This eMedTV page describes possible risk factors for cellulitis, as well as treatment options. Cellulities is a common misspelling of cellulitis.
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