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Drug Interactions With Clobetasol Propionate Foam - Facial Cellulitis

This page contains links to eMedTV Skin Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Clobetasol Propionate Foam to Facial Cellulitis. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Drug Interactions With Clobetasol Propionate Foam
    Using corticorelin or aldesleukin with clobetasol propionate foam may lead to potential drug interactions. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at what might happen when these medications are used together and describes how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Dacarbazine
    This eMedTV segment explains that lung problems, infections, and kidney damage are some of the problems that may occur when dacarbazine is combined with certain drugs. Other interactions are described in this article, as well as how to minimize your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Denileukin Diftitox
    Kidney damage, infections, or other problems may occur if certain drugs are used with denileukin diftitox. This eMedTV resource describes other interactions that may result from using certain products while receiving this chemotherapy treatment.
  • Drug Interactions With Desonide Cream
    If you combine aldesleukin or corticorelin with desonide cream, it may cause drug interactions. This eMedTV article describes the complications these reactions might cause and what your healthcare provider may do to minimize any problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Desoximetasone
    If you are using corticorelin or other drugs with desoximetasone, interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment describes the complications these reactions might cause and the steps your doctor might take to reduce your risk for problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Desoximetasone Spray
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, drug interactions may occur if desoximetasone spray is used in combination with aldesleukin or corticorelin. This article describes what may happen if these drugs are combined and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Drug Interactions With Diclofenac Gel
    Cyclosporine, lithium, and warfarin are medicines that diclofenac gel can interact with. This eMedTV article lists other medications that may interfere with diclofenac gel and describes the potential risks of these drug interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Diflorasone Emollient Cream
    If you combine diflorasone emollient cream with aldesleukin or corticorelin, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV article examines some of the problems that these reactions may cause and what your doctor may recommend to help ensure a safe treatment.
  • Drug Interactions With Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide
    If you are using erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide with certain skin products, it may cause skin reactions. This eMedTV page discusses possible interactions with erythromycin/benzoyl and other drugs, and describes the problems these reactions may cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Fluocinolone Oil
    Combining certain drugs (such as Exjade) with fluocinolone oil may result in complications. This eMedTV resource offers a list of other products that may cause drug interactions with fluocinolone oil and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Fluocinonide
    As this eMedTV segment explains, fluocinonide is known to interact with Proleukin and other drugs. This article gives some information on the effects of these interactions and talks about how you can reduce your risk of problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Flurandrenolide Lotion
    Combining flurandrenolide lotion with corticorelin or aldesleukin can cause drug interactions. This eMedTV page discusses how this combination may decrease the effectiveness of the medications and explains how to reduce your risk for these problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Fluticasone Propionate Cream
    People taking aldesleukin (a chemotherapy drug) may not be able to use fluticasone propionate cream. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at drug interactions with fluticasone propionate cream and explains what your doctor may suggest to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Hydrocortisone Butyrate
    Using aldesleukin or corticorelin with hydrocortisone butyrate can cause drug interactions. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes the complications these reactions may cause and also discusses how to minimize your risk for serious problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Hydroxyzine
    Alcohol, sleep medications, and anticholinergic drugs may negatively interact with hydroxyzine. As this eMedTV Web article explains, these drug interactions could increase your risk for developing potentially dangerous side effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Imiquimod
    Although most drugs are not expected to interfere with imiquimod, this does not mean problems cannot occur. This eMedTV segment takes a look at specific drugs that should not be combined with imiquimod, and explains why most interactions are unlikely.
  • Drug Interactions With IncobotulinumtoxinA
    Serious problems may occur if you combine incobotulinumtoxinA with Haldol, Botox, or other drugs. This eMedTV page explains why your doctor needs to know about other drugs you are taking before using incobotulinumtoxinA, and when interactions may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Ivermectin Lotion
    It is not expected that other drugs would react with ivermectin lotion. This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses the possibility of drug interactions with ivermectin lotion, explaining how reactions might be discovered in the future.
  • Drug Interactions With Metronidazole Gel
    This eMedTV Web page explains that when certain substances, such as alcohol, warfarin, or maraviroc, are combined with metronidazole gel, drug interactions can occur. This article describes the problems that can occur and how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Mometasone Furoate Ointment
    Taking aldesleukin or corticorelin along with mometasone furoate ointment may cause drug interactions. This eMedTV page takes a look at what might happen when these medicines are used together and describes how to reduce the risk of complications.
  • Drug Interactions With OnabotulinumtoxinA
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, neomycin, tobramycin, and certain other medications can cause drug interactions with onabotulinumtoxinA. This article lists these other products and explains the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Drug Interactions With Poly-L Lactic Acid
    There are no known drug interactions with injectable poly-L lactic acid at this time. As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, however, it is possible that interactions with this facial filler may be discovered at a later date.
  • Drug Interactions With Promethazine
    Epinephrine, pramlintide, and MAOIs can all cause drug interactions with promethazine. This eMedTV segment lists other medications that may react negatively with promethazine and describes the potentially serious problems that could result.
  • Drug Interactions With Tazarotene Foam
    Combining certain antibiotics or thiazides with tazarotene foam may increase your risk for problems. This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of products that may cause drug interactions with tazarotene foam and describes the complications that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Terbinafine
    Drug interactions with terbinafine may occur if it is taken with maprotiline, warfarin, or tamoxifen. This eMedTV Web page offers a more complete list of drugs that may cause a terbinafine interaction and explains the possible risks.
  • Drug Interactions With Topical Fluticasone Propionate
    If you are taking aldesleukin or corticorelin, you may not be able to use topical fluticasone propionate. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at drug interactions with topical fluticasone propionate and describes the potential problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream
    Combining aldesleukin or corticorelin with triamcinolone acetonide cream may result in drug interactions. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at what might happen when these medications are used together and describes how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Ustekinumab
    Warfarin, theophylline, and rotavirus vaccine are a few of the drugs that can interfere with ustekinumab. This eMedTV article discusses these ustekinumab interactions in more detail and lists other drugs that can interact with the psoriasis medication.
  • Drug Interactions With Vorinostat
    Dangerous heart rhythm problems and infections may occur if you combine vorinostat with certain drugs. This eMedTV Web page describes other interactions that may result and explains the steps your doctor may take to help avoid these complications.
  • Eczema and Protopic
    The FDA has approved Protopic for eczema, which is a type of atopic dermatitis. This page of the eMedTV site provides some important safety precautions to keep in mind when using this ointment, which can ensure the effectiveness of the drug.
  • Eladel
    Elidel can help relieve the symptoms of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis (eczema). This article from the eMedTV Web library takes a look at this prescription skin cream, including how it works and side effects. Eladel is a common misspelling of Elidel.
  • Eledel
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, people who have atopic dermatitis (eczema) may benefit from Elidel. This page describes how this medicine works, covers general dosing guidelines, and lists possible side effects. Eledel is a common misspelling of Elidel.
  • Eledil
    Elidel is a skin cream licensed to treat atopic dermatitis, also called eczema. This eMedTV Web selection offers a brief overview of this prescription skin cream and provides a link to more detailed information. Eledil is a common misspelling of Elidel.
  • Elidel
    Elidel is a medicine prescribed to treat atopic dermatitis in adults and children age two and older. This eMedTV resource presents an overview of this medicated skin cream, including how it works, possible side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Elidel 1%
    Apply a thin layer of Elidel 1% cream on affected skin areas to help relieve atopic dermatitis symptoms. This eMedTV Web selection examines how this medicated skin cream works and offers a link to more information on this eczema medication.
  • Elidel and Breastfeeding
    Women who use Elidel (pimecrolimus) while breastfeeding might expose their infant to potential problems. This eMedTV article discusses whether this drug passes through breast milk and describes some of the problems that might occur in a nursing infant.
  • Elidel and Eczema
    If you have atopic dermatitis (eczema), Elidel may help relieve your symptoms. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at how this prescription medicine works to treat this skin condition and provides a link to more detailed information on other uses.
  • Elidel and Pregnancy
    Elidel (pimecrolimus) may not be safe for use by pregnant women. This eMedTV Web selection examines the research that has been done on this skin medicine, including how it may increase the risk for miscarriages and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Elidel Cream
    A doctor may prescribe Elidel cream to treat atopic dermatitis in adults and children. This eMedTV article describes how this medicine works, covers dosing guidelines, and lists possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Elidel Cream and Cancer
    There are rare reports of people developing cancer while using Elidel cream. This page of the eMedTV Web site examines this potentially serious complication, including why people using this cream may have an increased risk for lymphoma or skin cancer.
  • Elidel Cream Strengths
    There is only one strength of Elidel Cream (1%), although various sizes of this product are available. This eMedTV resource examines some general dosing guidelines for this eczema drug and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Elidel Dosage
    A thin layer of Elidel cream is applied to affected skin areas twice daily to treat atopic dermatitis. This eMedTV segment provides some tips on how to ensure a safe treatment with Elidel, as well as dosing guidelines for treating atopic dermatitis.
  • Elidel Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article explains that Elidel can cause negative drug interactions with several products, including alcohol, other immunosuppressants, and certain steroids. This page lists these products and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Elidel for Psoriasis
    If you have psoriasis, your doctor may prescribe Elidel off-label. As this eMedTV segment explains, this is just one of the unapproved uses for this medicated skin cream. Other possible uses and a link to more details are also included.
  • Elidel for Treating Vitiligo
    A doctor may prescribe Elidel for treating vitiligo, although it is not an approved use of the drug. This eMedTV article offers a brief look at this unapproved, or off-label, use for this medicated skin cream and provides a link to more details.
  • Elidel Medication Information
    Elidel is a drug licensed to help relieve symptoms of atopic dermatitis (eczema). This eMedTV Web selection features a brief overview of important information on Elidel, including how this prescription medication works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Elidel Overdose
    This eMedTV segment explains that using too much Elidel can increase the risk for side effects, such as skin reactions. This page explains why an overdose on this cream is not likely to be dangerous and describes how problems may be treated.
  • Elidel Side Effects
    Warmth and burning at the application site are some of the most common Elidel side effects. This eMedTV resource examines other possible reactions to this medicine, including potentially dangerous problems that may require immediate medical treatment.
  • Elidel Uses
    This eMedTV Web selection explains how Elidel can help alleviate the symptoms of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis. This page describes other possible uses for Elidel, including some unapproved reasons a doctor may prescribe this skin cream.
  • Elidel Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV Web page explains why you may not be able to use Elidel if you have certain allergies or conditions. This article covers important precautions and warnings for Elidel, including what your doctor needs to know before starting treatment.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide
    Erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a drug that is prescribed to treat acne. This eMedTV Web resource offers an in-depth look at this medication, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the standard dose of erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a thin layer applied to the affected area twice daily. This page explains why it may take six to eight weeks for this drug to work and lists other important dosing tips.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Gel
    Available as a skin gel, erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a prescription acne medication. This eMedTV segment discusses how this medicine works, possible side effects, and dosing information. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Information
    Erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a prescription medicine used to treat acne. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide, explaining how the drug works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Side Effects
    Red, itchy, and dry skin are some of the most common side effects of erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide. This eMedTV segment further explores possible side effects, including statistics on how often they occur and when to contact your healthcare provider.
  • Extina
    Available by prescription only, Extina is a medicated foam used to treat seborrhea. This eMedTV Web selection contains a detailed overview of this drug, including topics such as how it works, how to apply it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Extina and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, it is unknown whether women can safely use Extina (ketoconazole foam) while breastfeeding. This page examines whether this drug passes through breast milk and what you should discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Extina and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV selection examines the safety issues associated with using Extina (ketoconazole foam) during pregnancy, including details on what happened when the active ingredient was given to pregnant animals. It also covers what your doctor may advise.
  • Extina Dosage
    Extina foam is used twice daily for four weeks to treat seborrhea. This article from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at Extina dosing instructions, including tips on how to prevent the foam from melting and how to effectively apply it.
  • Extina Drug Information
    Extina may help relieve symptoms of a skin condition called seborrhea. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Extina, including how this drug works, whether it is safe for use in children, and safety concerns. It also links to more details.
  • Extina Drug Interactions
    As explained in this eMedTV page, drug interactions with Extina are unlikely, as this medicine is applied on the skin and very little reaches the bloodstream. However, Extina may cause problems with other skin products (though this hasn't been studied).
  • Extina Overdose
    This eMedTV Web page explains that liver damage and hormonal imbalances could occur if you take Extina (ketoconazole foam) by mouth. This article explains what to do if you believe you have overdosed on Extina and how the effects might be treated.
  • Extina Side Effects
    People who use Extina may experience a burning sensation or other skin reactions. This eMedTV segment presents a detailed look at various side effects a person might develop with Extina, with tips on when to seek medical treatment.
  • Extina Uses
    By killing certain types of fungus, Extina can treat seborrhea in adults and children as young as age 12. This eMedTV article contains specific details on approved and unapproved uses for Extina, as well as an explanation of how the foam works.
  • Extina Warnings and Precautions
    If you use Extina, you may have an increased risk for skin reactions, including reactions to the sun. This eMedTV page discusses possible warnings and precautions with Extina and explains why this product may not be the best choice for some people.
  • Facial Cellulitis
    Facial cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that occurs on the face. This section of the eMedTV archives discusses facial cellulitis in detail, including information about its symptoms and common treatment options for the infection.
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