Skin Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Skin Articles A-Z

Precautions and Warnings With Ustekinumab - Tazarotene Foam Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV Skin Articles containing information on subjects from Precautions and Warnings With Ustekinumab to Tazarotene Foam Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ustekinumab
    As this eMedTV segment points out, you should not receive certain vaccines if you are taking ustekinumab. Other important warnings and precautions for the psoriasis drug are included in this article, including issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Vorinostat
    While using vorinostat, you will receive routine blood tests to check for serious complications. This eMedTV article contains specific warnings for how to safely take vorinostat, with precautions for people who may have an increased risk for problems.
  • Promethazine
    Promethazine is a prescription drug approved for various uses, including the treatment of nausea. This eMedTV segment covers these uses in more detail, describes how the medication works, explains when and how to use it, and more.
  • Promethazine 25 mg
    When using the drug to treat allergies, promethazine 25 mg can be taken before bedtime. This eMedTV resource explains how dosing with promethazine works for the treatment of other conditions, such as motion sickness or nausea and vomiting.
  • Promethazine Dosage
    The standard promethazine dosage for the treatment of motion sickness is 25 mg, taken twice a day. This eMedTV Web page also provides dosing guidelines for the treatment of other conditions, such as motion sickness and nausea or vomiting.
  • Promethazine for Nausea
    Promethazine is a prescription medicine commonly used for treating or preventing nausea and vomiting. As this eMedTV segment explains, doctors often prescribe promethazine for nausea and vomiting associated with surgery and certain types of anesthesia.
  • Promethazine HCL Medication Information
    As this page on the eMedTV Web site explains, promethazine HCl is a medication approved for various uses. Information concerning the approved uses, dosing guidelines, and warnings for this medication is included, with a link to an in-depth article.
  • Promethazine Oral
    Promethazine is used to treat nausea and many other conditions. As this eMedTV page explains, there are several forms of promethazine: oral tablets and syrup, rectal suppositories, and an injection. The drug is usually taken one to three times a day.
  • Promethazine Pills
    Promethazine can be taken orally, inserted rectally, or administered by injection. This eMedTV resource explores what this drug is used for, lists the various strengths available for promethazine pills, and explains how often this medicine is taken.
  • Promethazine Side Effects
    Potential promethazine side effects include hallucinations, a rapid heart rate, and stiff muscles. This eMedTV article lists other possible reactions to promethazine, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to your doctor.
  • Promethazine Tablets
    Promethazine is used to treat nausea and other conditions. As this eMedTV page explains, promethazine comes in tablet, syrup, rectal suppository, and injectable form. This article also explains how the drug works and lists possible side effects.
  • Promethezine
    Promethazine is commonly used as a nausea medication, but is approved for other uses as well. This eMedTV resource further describes this medicine and offers general dosing information. Promethezine is a common misspelling of promethazine.
  • Promethizine
    Promethazine is typically prescribed to treat nausea and various other conditions. This eMedTV segment describes this medicine in more detail and explains how it works for certain uses. Promethizine is a common misspelling of promethazine.
  • Protopac
    The FDA has approved Protopic as a "second-line" treatment for atopic dermatitis. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this drug, with a link to more detailed information. Protopac is a common misspelling of Protopic.
  • Protopic
    Protopic is a medicated ointment used in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (also called eczema). This eMedTV article provides a detailed look at this prescription drug, with information on side effects, dosing guidelines, safety precautions, and more.
  • Protopic 0.03%
    This eMedTV segment explains that the 0.03% strength of Protopic is used in children; adults use the higher strength, which this page also lists. Information on when this drug is prescribed is included, as is a link to more information.
  • Protopic 0.1% Ointment
    Two different strengths of Protopic ointment are available: 0.1% and 0.03%. This page of the eMedTV library also provides a brief overview of this prescription drug and includes a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Protopic and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV article explains that although the manufacturer recommends women not use Protopic when breastfeeding, very little of the drug is expected to be absorbed into the body with normal use. Applying the drug to the nipple area should be avoided.
  • Protopic and Pregnancy
    In general, women should avoid Protopic when pregnant, based on the results of animal studies. This eMedTV resource explains the results of these studies and describes situations when this skin ointment may still be recommended during pregnancy.
  • Protopic Dosage
    Although everyone applies the same Protopic dose, children may use the lower-strength version. This eMedTV resource provides some important dosing tips for this medicine, including what not to do during treatment and when to contact a healthcare provider.
  • Protopic Drug Interactions
    Even though it is applied to the skin, Protopic may interact with certain drugs. This eMedTV selection provides a detailed list of these medications, explains the problems that could occur, and describes how to avoid them.
  • Protopic Medication Information
    This page of the eMedTV library provides some basic information on Protopic, a medication used to treat atopic dermatitis. It explains when this drug is prescribed and what to discuss with the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Protopic Ointment
    Available in the form of an ointment, Protopic is used to treat severe cases of eczema (atopic dermatitis). This eMedTV article provides some basic dosing information on this drug, with a couple of important safety precautions to keep in mind.
  • Protopic Overdose
    The symptoms of a Protopic overdose will depend on how much is taken and how it is taken. This eMedTV segment lists possible problems that may occur, such as severe skin reactions or high blood pressure, and the treatment options.
  • Protopic Safety
    This eMedTV resource provides a few safety precautions for Protopic, a medicated skin ointment used to treat eczema. It addresses issues related to dosing and includes a link to the full-length article in the library on this topic.
  • Protopic Side Effects
    In clinical studies, 58 percent of people reported skin reactions as a possible Protopic side effect. This eMedTV page provides lists of both common reactions to this drug and those that, while not as common, are more serious and require medical care.
  • Protopic Treatment
    This page of the eMedTV archives provides some dosing tips on Protopic, a treatment for atopic dermatitis (eczema). It describes when the medicine is prescribed for this condition, things to avoid when using it, and a link to more information.
  • Protopic Uses
    Healthcare providers recommend Protopic be used only when other treatments have failed or are not an option. This eMedTV resource discusses the uses of the drug in detail, including how it works, whether it can be given to children, and off-label uses.
  • Protopic Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page explains that if your condition does not improve within six weeks, you may not have eczema and should not use Protopic. Warnings and precautions in this article also apply to people with certain medical conditions, among other things.
  • Reactions to Zyclara
    If you are using Zyclara, skin reactions like redness or dryness are likely to occur. This eMedTV Web page examines some of the most commonly reported side effects of this medicated skin cream. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Rheumatrex
    If you have psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or cancer, your healthcare provider may recommend Rheumatrex. This eMedTV Web page describes this prescription drug in detail, with information on how it works, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Rheumatrex Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended Rheumatrex dose for treating cancer can vary significantly. This article discusses dosing guidelines for Rheumatrex in detail, including recommendations for children and dosing for different conditions.
  • Rheumatrex Drug Interactions
    Probenecid, NSAIDs, antibiotics, and other drugs can cause interactions with Rheumatrex. This selection from the eMedTV library takes a closer look at these and other interactions, explaining the problems that may occur as a result.
  • Rheumatrex Medication Information
    Rheumatrex is a drug used to treat psoriasis and various other conditions. This eMedTV page offers some basic information on Rheumatrex, discussing the medication's warnings and possible side effects. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Rheumatrex Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article points out, Rheumatrex can cause serious side effects, such as severe diarrhea and low white blood cell counts. This article takes a look at other potential problems that can occur while taking this powerful medication.
  • Rheumatrex Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Rheumatrex is used for conditions ranging from psoriasis to juvenile arthritis. This article discusses the uses of this drug in more detail, explaining how it works, who can take it, and whether it is used "off-label."
  • Rheumatrex Warnings and Precautions
    In some cases, Rheumatrex has been known to cause lymphoma (a type of cancer). This article from the eMedTV library provides more in-depth Rheumatrex precautions and warnings, explaining why this powerful medication may not be right for everyone.
  • Side Effects of AbobotulinumtoxinA
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, side effects seen with abobotulinumtoxinA can include dry mouth, swollen eyelids, and muscle weakness. This article lists other side effects to be aware of and explains what to do if serious problems occur.
  • Side Effects of Acitretin
    Some of the common side effects of acitretin include hair loss, chapped lips, and high cholesterol. This eMedTV Web segment explores the severity of these and other side effects and describes which side effects may require immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Adapalene/Benzoyl Peroxide
    Skin reactions, such as dryness and redness, are the most common side effects of adapalene/benzoyl peroxide. This eMedTV page further explores possible side effects, including statistics on how often they occur and which reactions require medical care.
  • Side Effects of Alefacept
    As this eMedTV article explains, alefacept can sometimes cause side effects like chills, itching, muscle pain, and sore throat. This segment offers a more detailed list of possible side effects, including instructions on what to do if they occur.
  • Side Effects of Azelaic Acid Gel
    Skin reactions, such as a burning or stinging sensation, are the most common azelaic acid gel side effects. This eMedTV page further explores possible side effects, including statistics on how often they occur and which reactions require medical care.
  • Side Effects of Benzyl Alcohol Lotion
    Irritation, numbness, and pain at the application site are common side effects of benzyl alcohol lotion. This eMedTV page further explores possible reactions to this lotion, including statistics on how often they occur and which ones require medical care.
  • Side Effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A
    Most people don't usually experience side effects of botulinum toxin type A, but they can occur. This eMedTV page lists common side effects that have been seen with the drug, rare side effects, and side effects that require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Calcipotriene
    In clinical studies, the most common side effects of calcipotriene included burning, tingling, and stinging. This eMedTV page also describes reactions to this drug that are serious and require prompt medical care to avoid life-threatening complications.
  • Side Effects of Clemastine
    Potential side effects of clemastine include insomnia, fatigue, and indigestion or heartburn. This eMedTV Web page lists some of the most commonly reported side effects with this drug and also explains which problems may require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Diclofenac Gel
    Common side effects of diclofenac gel include redness, itching, and pain at the application site. This eMedTV Web page lists other common side effects and also describes potentially serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of IncobotulinumtoxinA
    Seek medical care if you are using incobotulinumtoxinA and develop blurred vision or difficulty swallowing. This eMedTV page examines other side effects of incobotulinumtoxinA, including details on how often they occurred in clinical trials.
  • Side Effects of Injectable Poly-L Lactic Acid
    Some of the common side effects of injectable poly-L lactic acid include swelling, itching, and pain. This eMedTV page further explores possible reactions to this product, including statistics on how often they occur and which ones require medical care.
  • Side Effects of Metronidazole Gel
    As this eMedTV page explains, metronidazole gel can cause side effects such as dry and scaling skin. This article examines many other reactions, such as eye irritation, difficulty breathing, and other serious problems that may require medical treatment.
  • Side Effects of Mupirocin
    In clinical studies, common side effects of mupirocin nasal ointment included headache and sore throat. This eMedTV page lists other side effects seen with all three forms of the drug (including serious ones), with information on the percentage affected.
  • Side Effects of OnabotulinumtoxinA
    Possible side effects of onabotulinumtoxinA include droopy eyelids, weakness, and back pain, among others. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed list of side effects, including the problems that should be reported to your doctor right away.
  • Side Effects of Spinosad
    Although most people have no problems during treatment with spinosad, side effects are possible. This eMedTV resource lists common side effects (such as skin irritation or redness at the application site) and rare but serious problems.
  • Side Effects of Terbinafine
    This eMedTV article lists possible terbinafine side effects, including headache, increased liver enzymes, or hives. Side effects that require medical attention are also listed, such as unexplained skin rash, wheezing, or vision changes.
  • Side Effects of Ustekinumab
    If you are taking ustekinumab, you may experience side effects such as chills, back pain, and fatigue. This eMedTV Web page offers a list of possible side effects that may occur with this psoriasis medication, including statistics on how often they occur.
  • Signs of Body Lice
    An unexplained rash and intense itching are some of the common signs of body lice. This page from the eMedTV archives describes other symptoms of body lice and provides an overview of what the body louse looks like in each stage of its life cycle.
  • Skin
    There are three layers of skin that work together to protect you and keep you healthy. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at skin, including information on what it is made of, as well as a description of what each layer does.
  • Skin Exam
    A regular skin exam will help you learn what is normal for your skin. This article on the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed explanation of how to perform this exam, when to perform it, and lists unusual things to look for.
  • Spinosad
    Available by prescription only, spinosad is a medication used to treat head lice. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers a complete overview of this medication, including dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Spinosad Application
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, spinosad must be applied to the entire scalp. This article offers helpful application tips for those about to use spinosad, and also includes a link to more detailed dosing guidelines on the drug.
  • Spinosad Dosage
    Spinosad comes in the form of a liquid that is applied to the hair and scalp. This eMedTV selection talks about how to get the most out of your spinosad dosage, including instructions on how long to leave the liquid on your hair.
  • Spinosad Drug Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic drug information on spinosad, a treatment for head lice. This article looks at how it works, possible side effects, and more. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Spinosad Drug Interactions
    At this time, there are no known spinosad drug interactions. However, as this eMedTV article explains, there could be interactions that have not been discovered yet. This article talks about this topic in more detail.
  • Spinosad Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV segment explains, spinosad should be kept away from the eyes, as it can cause eye irritation. This resource lists other problems that may occur with spinosad. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this product are also included.
  • Staf Infection
    A staph infection often appears as a red bump (or cluster of bumps) on the skin. This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at this illness, with information on its symptoms and treatment. Staf infection is a common misspelling of staph infection.
  • Staff Infection
    As this eMedTV page explains, staph infections are caused by bacteria and frequently affect the skin. This article gives a brief overview of this illness and links to more detailed information. Staff infection is a common misspelling of staph infection.
  • Staff Infection Causes
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Staphylococcus (a type of bacteria) is responsible for causing staph infections. This article takes a closer look at the causes of this illness. Staff infection causes is a common misspelling of staph infection causes.
  • Staph Disease
    A staph infection often appears as a single red bump on the skin. This eMedTV segment briefly explores the potential symptoms of this disease and explains how staph infections are spread. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Staph Infection
    When Staphylococcus bacteria cause infection within the body, it is called a staph infection. This eMedTV article talks about this contagious condition in greater detail, with information on symptoms, treatment options, prevention, and more.
  • Staph Infection Causes
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, staph infections are caused by Staphylococcus bacteria. This article discusses the different strains of Staphylococcus (including MRSA), describing the types of infections they can cause.
  • Staph Infection Complications
    Possible complications of a staph infection include pneumonia, serious MRSA infections, and meningitis. This eMedTV selection tells you what you need to know about problems that accompany a staph infection, including statistics on how often they occur.
  • Staph Infection Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, a doctor will make a staph infection diagnosis based on the results of your medical history, a physical exam, and certain tests. This article describes these tests and explains how long it typically takes to get results.
  • Staph Infection Prevention
    There is no vaccine to prevent staph infections. As this eMedTV article explains, prevention strategies are focused on practicing good hygiene, such as washing your hands and keeping cuts clean and covered with a bandage.
  • Staph Infection Risk Factors
    As this eMedTV page explains, living in a dormitory or other crowded place, or participating in contact sports increases your chances of getting a staph infection. This article offers a detailed list of risk factors for staph infections.
  • Staph Infection Symptoms and Signs
    Common signs of a staph infection include red bumps on the skin. As this eMedTV Web resource explains, these bumps may be mistaken for a spider bite or other skin problems. Other potential staph infections symptoms are also listed in this article.
  • Staph Infection Treatment
    As explained in this portion of the eMedTV library, staph infection treatment can involve antibiotics, warm compresses, or puncturing the skin to drain the infection. This resource offers an in-depth look at how this type of infection is treated.
  • Staph Infection Types
    Staph infections often affect the skin, but can also occur in the lungs and other parts of the body. This eMedTV Web page describes the many different staph infection types, listing the specific infections that can occur within various areas of the body.
  • Staph Skin Infection
    In many cases, staph infections affect the skin. As this eMedTV Web page explains, these infections typically occur where there is noticeable skin trauma, such as a cut. This resource also explains how the infections are diagnosed and treated.
  • Staph Transmission
    As this eMedTV page points out, staph infections are most often spread by direct skin-to-skin contact with an individual who has an active infection. This segment discusses how staph infections are transmitted, both in the community and in hospitals.
  • Staphylococcus Infection
    Staphylococcus ("staph") bacteria usually do not cause any problems in the body. However, as explained in this eMedTV article, they can sometimes cause an infection. This page gives an overview of Staphylococcus infections and links to more information.
  • Swimmer's Itch
    Swimmer's itch is caused by an allergic reaction to a parasite found in birds and aquatic mammals. This eMedTV resource discusses this phenomenon in detail, including the lifecycle of the parasite, symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis
    As this eMedTV article explains, common symptoms of atopic dermatitis include itching, hives, and a rash on the face or hands and feet. However, people with these symptoms don't always have atopic dermatitis; other conditions share these symptoms.
  • Symptoms of Cellulitus
    Redness, warmth, and swelling at the site of the infection are possible signs of cellulitis. This eMedTV page describes common symptoms and serious complications. Symptoms of cellulitus is a common misspelling and variation of cellulitis symptoms.
  • Symptoms of Decadron Withdrawal
    If you suddenly stop using Decadron, you may experience vomiting, confusion, and other withdrawal symptoms. This eMedTV page lists other possible symptoms and explains why you need to slowly reduce your dose of this drug.
  • Symptoms of Lichen Sclerosus
    Symptoms of lichen sclerosus vary, depending on the area affected, but itching is the most common. This eMedTV segement discusses symptoms of lichen sclerosus affecting the genital areas, such as the vulva, anus, and penis.
  • Tatsachen Uber Atopische Dermatitis
    Tatsachen Uber Atopische Dermatitis
  • Tazarotene Foam
    Tazarotene foam is a drug approved for the treatment of acne. This selection from the eMedTV Web library contains a comprehensive overview of this medication, including dosing instructions, details on how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Tazarotene Foam Dosage
    To treat acne with tazarotene foam, apply the foam on the affected areas once daily in the evening. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at tazarotene foam dosing instructions, including helpful suggestions on how to effectively use this medicine.
  • Tazarotene Foam Information
    This eMedTV Web page features some basic information on tazarotene foam, a medication used to treat acne in adults and adolescents. This resource also discusses how this prescription medicine works and why it may not be the best choice for some people.
  • Tazarotene Foam Side Effects
    Call your doctor if you are using tazarotene foam and develop hives or other severe skin reactions. This eMedTV page lists other side effects of tazarotene foam, including details on potentially serious problems that should be treated right away.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.