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More Details on Managing Lichen Sclerosus

Other Medications
Since topical corticosteroids are usually so effective, other treatment for lichen sclerosus is rarely recommended. The previous standard therapy was testosterone cream or ointment, but this has been proven to produce no more benefit than a placebo (inactive) cream. Furthermore, prolonged use of the testosterone cream or ointment can cause masculinization (low-pitched voice, increased coarse facial hairs, etc.).
 
Another hormone cream, progesterone, was previously used for lichen sclerosus treatment, but it has also been shown to be ineffective. Retinoids, or vitamin A-like medications, may be helpful for patients who cannot tolerate or who are not helped by highly potent topical corticosteroids.
 
Tacrolimus (Protopic®) ointment has been reported to benefit some patients, but more research is needed to confirm this. Tacrolimus is a steroid-free ointment -- it is not a corticosteroid. Tacrolimus has no apparent side effects other than local irritation at the site of application in some patients.
 
There are some early indications that different forms of ultraviolet light treatments, with or without psoralens (pills that intensify the effect of ultraviolet A light), may be an effective and well-tolerated treatment in some patients with the condition on non-genital skin.
 
Patients who need medication should ask their doctor how the medication works, what its side effects might be, and why it is the best treatment for their lichen sclerosus.
 
For women and girls, surgery to remove the affected skin is not an acceptable option, because lichen sclerosus comes back after the removal. Surgery may be useful for scarring, but only after lichen sclerosus is controlled with medication.
 

Lichen Sclerosus Treatment in Uncircumcised Men

In uncircumcised men, circumcision is the most common treatment for lichen sclerosus. This procedure removes the affected skin, and the disease usually does not come back.
 

Information on Lichen Sclerosus

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