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Alopecia Areata in Child

Alopecia areata is a disorder that typically begins in childhood. The disease may be inherited, but in most cases, it is not. When children have this disorder, their hair generally falls out in small, round patches. In rare cases, alopecia areata in a child can progress to complete loss of hair on the head or other parts of the body.

Alopecia Areata in a Child

Alopecia areata, a disease in which a person's white blood cells mistakenly attack the hair follicles, usually begins in childhood.
 
The most common sign of alopecia areata in a child is hair loss (the hair generally falls out in small, round patches the size of a quarter). Some children lose a few patches of hair, while others may lose much more. In rare cases, alopecia areata in children can progress to complete loss of hair on the head or complete loss of hair on the head, face, and body.
 
Alopecia areata could be an inherited disease, but most children with the condition do not have parents with the disorder. There may be, however, a number of genes that predispose certain people to it.
 
Even though alopecia areata is incurable, many medications can help promote hair growth. The most popular treatment for a child with alopecia areata is topical medicine.
 
(Click Alopecia Areata in Children for more details on treating children with this condition, including information on how the disease may affect them physically and emotionally, the possibilities of inheriting the condition, and tips on coping with it.)
 
 

Alopecia Areata Information

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